Friday, 2 December 2016

Dreams do come true!! The power of positive thinking made this woman turn her dream to reality



 Tina Aldatz of Irish and Mexican descent grew up in severe poverty in east Los Angeles. But today she lives a life opposite from her humble beginnings.



No one could have imagined that one day she be the owner of a multi-million dollar business.

But with hardwork, perseverance and dedication Tina escaped from a life of abuse and domestic violence to  Foot Petals, the shoe cushion company that turned her into a millionaire.

'No matter how far you get slammed down, you should be able to bounce back higher,' she says in a new video for Strayer University. 'That's how I've stayed positive.'

The eldest of six children, Tina says she often acted as a 'little mom' to her siblings, while her parents endured a 'tumultuous' relationship. 'It got so bad,' she says. 'That we ended up in this shelter for battered women and children.' 

Tina, now 47, eventually got a job at 21 after she left school before completing tenth grade as to support the family. She later moved to New-York to pursue her dream in fashion. Tina as she struggled to change her life had to take in her step siblings after her dad died. According to her ' I wanted to change the legacy for my family.'

By this time, Tina was making good money as she had started Foot Petals, inspired by a horrific accident when she was just a child which causes delicate blister prone feet hence making her look for something to cushion them.

Within ten years of starting the company, Tina, who now lives in Orange County, had turned her simple idea into a thriving business that she sold for $14million.

She now on her second company, as the CEO and co-founder of lifestyle brand Savvy Travelers, and author of From Stilettos to the Stock Exchange, which details her incredible rise to success. 
'I look around and I cannot believe this is my life,' Tina adds. 'It's also a real exciting feeling to see other people create their careers.

She says her biggest regret is not having a formal education, and has helped to form a mentor program for Latinos who are college-bound.

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